INCONVENIENT by David Wallraf

review

Here’s a write-up for the Inconvenient tape by ANTI : Music Review. Very happy abou this…

A n t i : Music Review

Spanning nearly a decade in ambient-noise music – and with a flux of ingenious releases, being the most recent a split-tape with Jeans Beast, and a ’no audience participation‘ double-CD with 5-live recordings, all in October – David Wallraf courses his noisy, musical journey into wild experimental releases, mainly cassette’s. But, one exceeds his work, above all others, as getting to writing this review has been racking in my head for a while.
Terrain blossoms worlds tempered only in conflict and unease. Atmosphere is made applicable to the iconic, harsh noise architecture, blending into unity and chaos occupying the presence of laden strength. David Wallraf accomplishes an album intriguing but never-lasting, so I set this album to repeat as much I can, as it’s a perfect force of contemplation. 
Inconvenient was released through Industrial Coast, premiering only the first song on July 25, 2020, and self-releasing in full-length July 17…

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H – first tape released on stoffe

H, release, review

The first cassette-album by H, -log p, is finally released on the new STOFFE-label. The featured tracks span a five year period of live improvisations recorded in a practice room at Hamburgs FleischGroßmarkt. The tape was mastered by Brandon Hacura and designed by Konstantin Bessonov and Phil Struck.

Limited edition of 50, available now at bandcamp.

The tape was reviewed by Tristan Bath on The Quietus:

„Spanning five years worth of live improvisations recorded by a German duo sparring noisemaking electronics and drum kit, – log p by H (one of the first tape issued by the brand new and mysterious STOFFE imprint from Hamburg) shouldn’t be anything like as cohesive and satisfying as it is. Recorded in a practice room at Hamburg’s FleischGroßmarkt, these six tracks head deep into long rhythmic wig outs, perhaps latently resembling Black Dice or even Boredoms. But overall it’s slower and darker – haunted even. Tracks such as the catchily titled ‘p(AB)p(B)p(A)’ go menacingly nowhere slowly for ten minutes at a stretch.

David Wallraf mans the aforementioned electronic noisemaking gear, with online video clips showing him controlling banks of netted synth modules and mixers, yelling inaudible gibberish into processed microphones, turning voltage into a mixture of cycling drones, bass buzz, and leering ambience. The fact that drummer Klaus Frieler is so patient throughout is perhaps the key to what makes H so damn compelling for such a simple duo. He calmly moves forward on the lengthy ‘E = hf’ without ever falling into a motorik loop or pounding angrily; he just calmly sets the pace while Wallraf’s bed of noisy flowers slowly blooms into a breathtaking chaos of bubbling electronics growing angry. They take their time getting there, but H at their peak are something exceptional.“